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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. massive spending cuts and tax hikes are set to hit the u.s. economy on january first. by most estimates if we go over the cliff, the u.s. onomy will plunge into recession. >> susie: we look at the impact of the coming cliff and whether congress and the white house can strike a deal. >> tom: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! it was the chairman of the federal reserve ben bernanke who first called it a fiscal cliff. he described the coming automatic cuts in government spending and increases in taxes as, quote, "a massive fiscal cliff," end quote. here's what he was describing: on january 1, 2013, tax breaks worth $416 billion will expire. spending on things like defense, medicare payments to doctors will be slashed by $65 billion. add it all up and you are talking about cutting roughly half a trillion dollars from the federal budget. the congressional budget office and others warn going over the cliff will send the economy into a recession in the first half of next year. it was congress and the white house that set the deadline in hopes of forcing each other to cut
of the taxes scheduled to go up if we go over the fiscal cliff will hit investors. we ask the c.e.o. of utility next era energy lew hay about higher taxes on dividends and stock gains. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! black friday comes early this year. all across the country americans are already lining up outside stores, camping out for the earlier-than-ever start to the holiday shopping season. scenes like this are popping up in shopping mall parking lots. these tents are pitched outside a best buy in tampa, florida, where shoppers are hoping to get the early-bird holiday specials. with big retail chains opening their doors for black friday, on thursday night, there are complaints about companies putting commerce ahead of family time. walmart has been threatened with protests by its employees. the company filed a complaint with the national labor relations board hoping to stop the demonstrations, but the board won't rule on it before tomorrow. diane eastabrook looks at the personal price of thanksgiving day store hours. >> reporter: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago
lawmakers pledging never to vote for higher taxes. find out what grover norquist thinks will happen with the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and hewlett packard stuns investors with news of an $9 billion mistake. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. > uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spen
-off over tax increases and spending cuts. the dow fell 89 points, the nasdaq lost nine, the s&p 500 down seven. >> tom: as susie mentioned, talks to resolve the fiscal cliff are moving slowly. one reason is that there is deep disagreement over whether entitlement programs like social security and medicare should be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury bonds it holds in its trust fund. but conservatives point out t
in taxes. >> reporter: the president and congressional leaders are unlikely to rse the retirement age for medicare to 67 since polls show that's very unpopular. and they will try to minimize opposition to any other changes they make. >> i think a pretty small share of the spending savings will be actually structural reforms or things that could directly affect beneficiaries and those things will probably be slowly phased in. >> reporter: but without an agreement to trim entitlements, republicans say they won't raise taxes. and the white house says the president is not backing down. >> he will not sign an extension of the bush-era tax cuts for the top 2% because it's bad economic policy. >> reporter: the president's tax plans got some support from legendary investor warren buffett today. writing in the new york times, buffett says higher taxes won't lead the wealthy to go on strike and give up promising investment opportunities. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: talk of the fiscal cliff threat didn't seem to hurt cyber monday, the biggest online shopping day of the year. amer
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)